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Changes in Erythrocyte Contents of Potassium, Sodium and Magnesium and Na, K-pump Activity after the Administration of Potassium and Magnesium Salts

1506

Pote Sriboonlue MSc, MCH*,
Sudjai Jaipakdee MSc**, Dusit Jirakulsomchok PhD***,
Eimorn Mairiang MD****, Piyaratana Tosukhowong MSc*****,
Vitoon Prasongwatana MSc, MD*, Sompong Savok BSc******

* Department Biochemistry, Faculty Medicine, Khon Kaen University
** Clinical Laboratory Unit, Sakon Nakorn Provincial Hospital
*** Department Physiology, Faculty Medicine, Khon Kaen University
**** Department Radiology, Faculty Medicine, Khon Kaen University
***** Department Biochemistry, Faculty Medicine, Chulalongkorn University
****** Medical Technologist, Srinagarind Hospital, Faculty Medicine, Khon Kaen University

Abstract


Low potassium and magnesium status and decreased Na, K-pump activity is an endemic condition among rural Northeast Thais. The authors examined the effect of supplementing potassium and magnesium on erythrocyte potassium, sodium and magnesium content and on Na, K-pump activity. Rural Northeast Thai renal stone patients (62) were recruited, divided into four groups and supplemented for one month with potassium chloride (Group1, n = 16), potassium-sodium citrate (Group2, n = 15), chelated magnesium (Group 3, n =16) and potassium-magnesium citrate (Group 4, n =15) in order to achieve 40 mmol potassium, 10 mmol magnesium and 60 mmol citrate daily. After supplementation with potassium (Groups 1, 2 and 4), plasma potassium and Na, K-pump activity rose significantly in Groups 1, 2 and 4, but erythrocyte potassium rose only in Groups 2 and 4. When supplementing elemental magnesium (Groups 3 and 4), the chelated magnesium caused a significant increase in plasma potassium, erythrocyte potassium, sodium and magnesium without a significant increase in Na, K-pump activity. By contrast, potassium-magnesium citrate caused a significant increase in erythrocyte potassium and magnesium and Na, K-pump activity, but depressed erythrocyte sodium. These results suggest the forms of potassium and /or magnesium salts being supplemented should be considered because they affect erythrocyte potassium, sodium and magnesium content and Na, K-pump activity differently.

Keyword : Erythrocyte Na, K-pump, Potassium supplementation, Magnesium supplementation,Renal stone



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